Thursday, May 31, 2012

14 Foods that Cleanse the Liver | Natural Health & Organic Living Blog

14 Foods that Cleanse the Liver | Natural Health & Organic Living Blog


14 Foods that Cleanse the Liver

Author: Dr. Edward Group 06/24/2010 @ 10:45 am
 
 
Modern society has created a sad state for our over-processed livers. Anytime we overeat or eat processed or fried foods, and, anytime we are exposed to environmental pollutants or stress, the liver becomes overworked and overloaded. When the liver is taxed, it cant process toxins and fat in an efficient way. There are many foods that can help cleanse the liver naturally by stimulating the natural ability to clean toxic waste from the body.

List of Foods that Cleanse the Liver

In the past, I have discusses my favorite cleansing foods. This list is a little more specific and focuses mainly on foods that can help cleanse your liver. In addition to taking a liver-cleansing supplement, and performing at least two liver and gallbladder cleanses per year, eating the following foods is the best way to keep your liver healthy and functioning the way you need it to. I would encourage you to incorporate these liver cleanse foods into your weekly diet.
Garlic

1. Garlic

Just a small amount of this pungent white bulb has the ability to activate liver enzymes that helps your body flush out toxins. Garlic also holds high amounts of allicin and selenium, two natural compounds that aid in liver cleansing.
Grapefruit

2. Grapefruit

High in both vitamin C and antioxidants, grapefruit increasea the natural cleansing processes of the liver. A small glass of freshly-squeezed grapefruit juice will help boost production of liver detoxification enzymes that help flush out carcinogens and other toxins.
Beets

3. Beets and Carrots

Both extremely high in plant-flavonoids and beta-carotene, eating both beets and carrots can help stimulate and improve overall liver function.
Green Tea

4. Green Tea

This liver-loving beverage is chock-full of plant antioxidants known as catechins, a constituent known to assist the livers overall functions. Green tea is not only delicious, it’s also a great way to improve your overall diet. Learn more about the benefits of green tea.
Leafy Greens

5. Leafy Green Vegetables

One of our most powerful allies in cleansing the liver, leafy greens can be eaten raw, cooked or juiced. Extremely high in plant chlorophylls, greens literally suck up environmental toxins from the blood stream. With their distinct ability tonuetralize heavy metals, chemicals and pesticides, these cleansing foods offer a powerful protective mechanism for the liver.
Try incorporating leafy greens such as bitter gourd, arugula, dandelion greens, spinach, mustard greens and chicory into your diet. This will help increase the creation and flow of bile, the substance that removes waste from the organs and blood.
Avocado

6. Avocados

This nutrient-dense super-food helps the body produce glutathione, which is necessary for the liver to cleanse harmful toxins. Recent studies indicate improved liver health when avocados are eaten regularly.
Apple

7. Apples

High in pectin, apples hold the chemical constituents needed for the body to cleanse and release toxins from the digestive tract. This, in turn, makes it easier for the liver to handle the toxic load during the cleansing process.

Olive Oil

8. Olive Oil

Cold-pressed organic oils such as olive, hemp and flax-seed are great for the liver, when used in moderation. They help the body by providing a lipid base that can suck up harmful toxins in the body. In this way, it takes some of the burden off the liver in terms of the toxic overload that many of us suffer from.
Whole Grains

9. Whole Grains

Grains, such as brown rice, are rich in B-complex vitamins, nutrients known to improve overall fat metabolization, liver function and liver decongestion. If possible, do not eat foods with white flour, instead try eating whole wheat alternatives.
Broccoli

10. Cruciferous Vegetables

Eating broccoli and cauliflower will increase the amount of glucosinolate in your system, adding to enzyme production in the liver. These natural enzymes help flush out carcinogens, and other toxins, out of our body which significantly lowers our risk of cancer.
Lemons and Limes

11. Lemons & Limes

These citrus fruits contain very high amounts of the vitamin C, which aids the body in synthesizing toxic material into substance that can be absorbed by water. Drinking freshly-squeezed lemon or lime juice in the morning helps stimulate the liver.

12. Walnuts

Walnuts
Holding high amount of the amino acid arginine, walnuts aid the liver in detoxifying ammonia. Walnuts are also high in glutathione and omega-3 fatty acids which support normal liver cleansing actions. Make sure you chew the nuts well (until they are liquefied) before swallowing.
Cabbage

13. Cabbage

Much like broccoli and cauliflower, eating cabbage helps stimulate the activation of two crucial liver detoxifying enzymes that help flush out toxins. Try eating more kimchi, coleslaw, cabbage soup and sauerkraut.
Turmeric Powder

14. Turmeric

The liver’s favorite spice. Try adding some of this detoxifying goodness into your next lentil stew or veggie dish for an instant liver pick-me-up. Turmerichelps boost liver detox, by assisting enzymes that actively flush out known dietary carcinogens.

Tips For Doing a Liver Cleanse

Other liver cleanse foods not listed above are artichoke, asparagus, kale and brussel sprouts. Eating the foods listed above is a great way to keep your liver functioning properly. However, for the best results, I would recommend doing a liver cleanse. Doing a liver cleanse at least twice a year will eliminate any foreign substances that may be trapped in your liver.

Your Liver is the Key To Health! - NaturalNews.tv

Your Liver is the Key To Health! - NaturalNews.tv

Sunday, May 13, 2012

DIY Cucumber Skin Care Recipes | Beautylish

DIY Cucumber Skin Care Recipes | Beautylish

Here’s a Quick Way to Make Healing Herbal Facial

Here’s a Quick Way to Make Healing Herbal Facial


Here’s a Quick Way to Make Healing Herbal Facial


Every morning, I start the day with a cup of herbal tea. About a year ago, I completely gave up energy drinks and coffee, as well as green and black tea. My decision to proceed only with herbal teas was very spontaneous. Sorry for giving you too many details here, but I was just tired of sweating terribly! Yes, I had this problem, and tea and coffee were making it worse.
Anyway, after starting drinking only herbal tea, not only has my problem with excess of sweating almost has disappeared; I have also noticed very pleasant changes in my complexion. To be more specific, I drink chamomile in the morning and mint in the evening, as it is very relaxing and makes you drowsy. After drinking these herbal teas for two weeks, I noticed that my face acquired a healthier color and my skin became smoother.
Here’s a Quick Way to Make Healing Herbal FacialThis was a “aha” moment for me. I started to dig deeper to herbal therapy and I couldn’t stop. I found that herbs are an amazing gift from nature, which can be used for just about everything that concerns the health of your skin. There are lots of methods that use herbs. However, today I want to tell you about the simplest herbal beauty tips for face – so called herbal wash. I’ll discuss how to easily use herbs to wash your face from impurities and substitute them for your daily cleanser, or the simple procedure of washing your face with water.
As for me, I always have some different herbal tea bags at home, and every morning I brew them with boiling water. After pampering myself with herbal tea, I just take the tea bag and do my morning herbal facial wash (wipe my face with a herbal bag).
The procedure of washing your face with herbs can be this simple. Or you also can whip up more sophisticated mixtures.
Here are my herbal beauty tips for face:

Magical herbs for your skin type

Herbs for facial should be chosen for your skin type or to deal with any specific problems of your skin. I made a list of the exact recipes you could use for your skin type, so run through the whole list to find the recipe written for you. Some recipes contain several herbs, You can use the entire recipe or just use one of the herbs from the recipe on its own.

Herbal wash recipes for every skin type

Take 2 tablespoons of fresh or dry mint, chamomile, calendula, or sage leaves. Pour 1-cup of boiling water over the herbs. Steep for 1 hour. Strain and wipe your face with a cotton wool soaked in this decoction. You can also add 1 teaspoon of honey. Use of this decoction is recommended for hot weather, as it cleanses, tones, and refreshes the skin. In the cold seasons, mix together a tablespoon of mint, half a glass of hot milk and leave for 30-40 minutes to steam.
Also the same way, you can brew:
For dry skin – linden, birch leaves.
For oily skin – horsetail, nettle.
Combination skin – parsley, bay leaf
For freckles – parsley, calendula, cornflower.
For aging skin – horsetail, calendula, mint, linden

Herbal facial wash recipes from herbal mixtures

For dry skin:
Mix equal proportions of dried flowers of linden, sage, chamomile, mint leaves, dill and fresh rose or rosehip petals. Mix 2 tablespoons of herbs with half a liter of cold water. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 5 minutes. Allow the toner to cool completely, then strain and use for daily face cleaning.
For dry and sensitive skin:
Take 1 tablespoon of fresh or dried rose petals, chamomile, jasmine and linden, and mix them with 1 cup of boiling water. Tightly cover and leave for about 2 hours, then strain out the petals. Wiping your face with this lotion each day promotes good nutrition and moisturizes skin.
Take 2 tablespoons of marshmallow root and combine with 1 cup of cool boiled water. Steep for a day. After straining, use this mixture as a toner to wipe your beautiful face.
For oily skin:
Mix equal amount of dried petals of daisies, cornflowers, calendula, chamomile and rose. Combine 1 tablespoon of these flowers with half a cup of boiling water. Simmer for 7-10 minutes on low heat. Then strain and use this as a cleanser.
For oily skin with pimples:
Take 2 teaspoons of dried chamomile flowers and 2 teaspoons of calendula and St. John’s wort. Combine all the herbs with 1 cup of boiling water. Cover tightly and leave for 2-3 hours. Cleanse the skin with this infusion daily, or mix with water for washing in a 1:1 ratio.
For aging skin:
Take 1 teaspoon of each dried herb chamomile, horsetail, sage and linden. Combine with 1 cup of boiling water and steep for 30-40 minutes. After wiping your face with this toner, use it to wash your skin in the morning and again in the evening. This cleanser will help prevent wrinkles.
So Ladies, have you ever tried herbal facial wash? Have you used herbs in your skin care routine? Please share your thoughts.

DIY Gift For The Chocolate Lover On Your Holiday List: Chocolate Lip Balm

DIY Gift For The Chocolate Lover On Your Holiday List: Chocolate Lip Balm

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

The anti-aging effects of cucumbers

The anti-aging effects of cucumbers

Detoxify heavy metals and soothe chronic inflammation with cilantro, a powerful 'superherb'

Detoxify heavy metals and soothe chronic inflammation with cilantro, a powerful 'superherb'

Juicing Recipes - StumbleUpon

Juicing Recipes - StumbleUpon


Twenty-Three
      Most Popular
        Juice Recipes

 
 Classic Green Drink
Carrots4
Celery2 Stalks
Parsley1 Handful
Spinach4 Leaves
CBS Tonic
Carrots3
Beets1/2
Spinach3 Leaves
  
Citrus Delight
Orange1
Lemon1/4
Grapefruit1/4 (W/O peel)
  
Tip Top Tonic
Apple1
Carrots4
  
  
Carrot Cleanser
Carrots3
Beet1/2
Cucumber1/2
  
Ginger Zinger
Apple1
Carrots4
Ginger1 inch
  
Fab Fruit Cocktail
Apple2
Cranberries1 cup
Grapes1 Bunch
  
Tomato Salad Drink
Tomato1 Large
Parsley1 Handful
Spinach2 Leaves
Bell Pepper1/4
Tropical Envy
Beets1/2
Carrots2
Celery1 Stalk
Cucumber1/2
Ginger1 inch
Parsley1 Handful
Pineapple2 Rounds
Ruby Begonia
Apple1
Beets1/4
Carrots2
Raspberries8
Maui Wowie
Ginger1 inch
Pineapple2 Rounds
Sparkling Water1/4 cup
  
Mondo Berry
Apple1
Blueberries10
Strawberries10
Raspberries8










Fred & Ginger

Apple1
Carrots2
Celery1 Stalk
Ginger1 inch

Veg-Tang Tonic
Carrots3
Celery1 Stalk
Parsley1 Handful
Garlic1 Clove
Green Apple Drink
Apple1
Carrots3
Parsley1 Handful
Spinach3 Leaves
Grape Delight
Grapes1 Bunch
Apples3
Lemon1/4 (W/O peel)
  
Liver Cleanse
Apple2
Grapefruit1/4 (W/O peel)
Grapes1 Small Bunch
Lemon1/4 (W/O peel)
Beets1/2
Tomato Surprise
Tomato1 Large
Carrots2
Celery1 Stalk
Cucumber1/2
Spinach3 Leaves
Rise and Shine
Carrots4
Oranges2
  
  
Earth Goddess
Carrots2
Celery1 Stalk
Beets1/2
Parsley1 Handful
Lemon1/4 (W/O peel)
Waldorf
Apple1
Celery1 Stalk
Ginger1 inch
Parsley1 Handful
Lemon1/4 (W/O peel)
Strawberry Fields Forever
Apple2
Carrots2
Strawberries8
  
Red Eye
Carrots3
Beets1/2
Garlic1 Clove
Ginger1 inch
Scallions2




         

Juice Recipes for Clear & Smooth Skin

Today I am going to share articles on juicing.

Juice Recipes for Clear & Smooth Skin

Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Hibiscus Tea

Hibiscus Tea

Interesting facts about the benefits of the  Hibiscus flower .

Are you looking for some information on hibiscus tea? If so, this website is for you.
You’ll learn what hibiscus flower and hibiscus tea is, you’ll read about healthbenefits of the tea (such asblood pressure lowering properties, improved heart health and aid in weight loss) and of course you’ll learn how to make cold and hot tea.
Let’s start with basic facts about hibiscus from which the tea is made.

Hibiscus is a genus of flowering plants in the mallow family, Malvaceae. It contains several hundred species that are native to warm-temperate, subtropical and tropical regions throughout the world (such as Mexico, Thailand, Pacific Islands, Egypt or Sudan). Member species are commonly known as hibiscus, sorrel, flor de Jamaica or rosemallow.
Hibiscus has many uses. Many species are used to attract butterflies, bees, and hummingbirds. One species of hibiscus is used to make paper. Hibiscus tea is a very popular beverage consumed by people all over the world. It’s also used as a mild medicine. Dried hibiscus is edible.

The tea from hibiscus is the infusion prepared using the calyx of the hibiscus flower. It is NOT made from the flowers of leaves of the plant. The tea has a tart taste, a bit like cranberries. It’s a beverage consumed by people all over the world, from Jamaica to Egypt and Sudan.
There are many different ways to make the tea from hibiscus. It can be consumed both hot and cold. Since it has a tart flavor, it’s often sweetened with honey or sugar.
Agua de Flor de Jamaica, popular mostly in Jamaica and other Caribbean countries, Mexico and Central America is served chilled and sugared.
Karkadé, very popular especially in Egypt and Sudan, is served hot or chilled with ice. In Egypt and Sudan it’s a tradition that wedding celebrations are toasted with a glass of hibiscus tea.
Roselle, popular in Thailand and Malaysia, is drunk cold and sugared. It can also be made into a wine.
Carcadè, popular in Italy, is also usually drunk cold and sugared, very often with squeezed lemon juice.

Hibiscus tea provides many health benefits. Here are a few of them:
1. It’s rich in vitamin C
Contrary to what many people think, vitamin C doesn’t prevent against the common cold. However, it may reduce the duration of illness. Vitamin C is also a strong antioxidant, which means that it protects from the damaging effects of free radicals.
2. It can reduce high blood pressure (or help maintain healthy blood pressure)
Studies done at Tufts University of Boston show that drinking three cups of hibiscus tea each day lowers blood pressure by an average of 7 points (after six weeks).
Another study (by researchers from Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Health, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd, Iran) shows that drinking the tea from hibiscus has positive effects on blood pressure in type II diabetic patients with mild hypertension.
3. It’s a diuretic
Diuretics are used to treat hypertension, cirrhosis and certain kidney diseases. Since diuretics increase the excretion of water from body, hibiscus tea also aids in weight loss. Speaking of which…
4. Hibiscus aids in weight loss
Hibiscus tea has zero calories (if it isn’t sweetened) and is caffeine-free. It may increase satiety and it’s a diuretic so it aids in weight loss (if you don’t sweeten it; neither honey nor sugar will help you lose weight!). The fruit acids in hibiscus may work like a laxative. Consuming the tea after the meal helps in breaking down starch and sugar which eventually aids in fat loss.
5. It helps maintain healthy cholesterol levels and lowers the risk of heart disease
According to a study performed by Shan Medical University’s Institute of Biochemistry in Taiwan, extract from the hibiscus flower lowers both LDL cholesterol levels and the risk of heart disease. Read more about hibiscus tea and heart health.
6. It contains antioxidants
The tea from hibiscus contains antioxidants which protect against the development of cancer and may help prevent heart disease. Moreover, as mentioned before, antioxidants protect from the damaging effects of free radicals.
7. It’s high in electrolytes
Since hibiscus is high in electrolytes such as chloride, magnesium, potassium and sodium, the tea can be used to replenish electrolytes in the body after exercise. Without electrolytes, you wouldn’t survive!
To sum up, drinking the tea from hibiscus is definitely a great way to take care of your health!
Please keep in mind that if you have any health problems, you should always first consult drinking the tea with your doctor.

Most herbal medicines have side effects and may interact with other herbs or drugs. The tea from hibiscus isn’t an exception. There are certain cases when you should avoid drinking the tea such as:
  • individuals suffering from hypotension (low blood pressure) – because hibiscus tea reduces blood pressure
  • before driving (if you drink the tea for the first time) – some people experience hallucinations
  • during pregnancy and breastfeeding – it isn’t known yet if the tea from hibiscus is safe for consumption during pregnancy and breastfeeding
  • people who are on a hormone replacement therapy or had undergone it or women who are using birth control pills (because hibiscus may affect estrogen levels)
Moreover, the tea may interact with antihypertensive drugs (blood-pressure lowering drugs), anti-cancer drugs and acetaminophen.
Read Hibiscus Tea Side Effects to learn more about side effects, precautions and possible interactions with the tea.

Now you probably want to know how to make hibiscus tea. The easiest way to consume hibiscus is to prepare hot tea. Don’t worry – it’s very easy and quick! Here are instructions:
Step 1. Heat fresh water to a boil.
Step 2a. If you have loose leaf tea:
  • put 1 tablespoon of hibiscus loose leaf tea in a teapot OR:
  • put 1 teaspoon of hibiscus loose leaf tea in a mug
Pour boiling water into your teapot or mug, cover your mug or close your teapot and wait for 5 to 10 minutes, depending on how you like your tea (10 minutes will result in a very strong tea). Your tea is ready to drink when it’s ruby red.
The tea from hibiscus has a tart taste. If you’d like it sweeter, add a tablespoon of honey or some sugar (remember that if you sweeten your tea, it will no longer be 0 calories).
Step 2b. If you have hibiscus tea tea bags:
Put 1 tea bag in a teapot or a mug, pour boiling water into your teapot or mug, close teapot or cover mug and wait for 5 minutes. Your tea is ready to drink when it’s deep red.
The tea has a tart flavor. If you’d like your tea sweeter, you can add a tablespoon of honey or some sugar (remember that your drink will no longer be calorie-free so it won’t aid you in fat loss!).
Step 3. Enjoy! There are many ways to drink the tea from hibiscus. You can experiment with different spices such as cloves (add one or two cloves), ginger (add a slice of ginger to your tea), cinnamon, nutmeg or even add a little rum (that’s how they sometimes drink it in Jamaica).

You can also drink hibiscus ice tea. Here’s the easiest way to make it:
You’ll need:
  • 6 cups of cold water
  • 2 cups of ice
  • 1/2 cup of hibiscus flower tea leaves
  • 1/2 cup of sugar (or any other natural sweetener including honey)
Before we start, keep in mind that hibiscus stains easily – pick a pot that won’t stain and be very careful, especially while pouring the liquid into a pitcher!
Step 1. Bring water to boil.
Step 2. Remove water from heat. Add hibiscus flower tea leaves and sugar to the water. Stir until all the sugar has dissolved.
Step 3. Place a lid over the pot and steep for 10 minutes.
Step 4. Pour the liquid into a pitcher. Add ice and if necessary, more cold water and/or sugar or honey.
Step 5. Cool completely and serve with plenty of ice in a glass.
Step 6. Enjoy!
What are you waiting for? Let’s drink some hibiscus tea!